In a speech to the Knesset Wednesday, British premier David Cameron said that although British businesses are officially advised not to invest in the West Bank ”Britain opposes boycotts, whether it's trade unions campaigning for the exclusion of Israelis or universities trying to stifle academic exchanges.” “You know I want peace and a two-state solution,” he said. “You don’t need lectures from me about how to get there.”

He said  peace dividends would involve "an end to the outrageous lectures on human rights that Israel receives at the United Nations from the likes of Iran and North Korea; an end to the ridiculous situation where last year the United Nations general assembly passed three times as many resolutions on Israel as on Syria, Iran and North Korea put together. No more excuses for the 32 countries in the United Nations who refuse to recognize Israel."

Cameron barely touched on the settlements issue and instead focused on the improved quality of life peace would bring both peoples. Cameron said that his belief in Israel is “unbreakable and his commitment to Israel’s security rock solid. I will always stand up for the right of Israel to defend its citizens." On his pro-Israel credentials the British premier declared that he had “removed the threats to Israelis traveling to Britain and removed preachers of anti-Semitic hate.”

Cameron on his first visit to Israel, will hold talks with Binyamin Netanyahu and call on the president before traveling to Ramallah to meet Palestinian leaders.